Update: H Word posts on books, hoaxes, lives and laptops

Posts over on The H Word, from the last little while. Comments on all of these are now closed, but please feel free to continue any of the conversations in the comments here – particularly on reading about science, discussed in the last post listed here.  On that theme, see also Georgina Voss’s post asking for suggestions of fictional works that help explore the politics of science and technology.

 

Twenty years on from Longitude… rewriting the “villainous” Nevil Maskelyne

A new book on a Georgian Astronomer Royal reveals that there was a great deal more to Nevil Maskelyne than being clockmaker John Harrison’s bête noire.

The Great Moon Hoax and the Christian Philosopher

180 years ago newspaper readers were thrilled by a story about plants, animals and flying men on the Moon. Why were people convinced, was it a hoax, and why was it written? Was it a satire that went wrong?

Anna Atkins: Google’s tribute to a pioneer of botany and photography

One of the few women to gain presence in 19th-century science, her book, containing cyanotypes of botanical specimens, was the first to contain photographic images.

Destroyed Snowden laptop: the curatorial view

The Snowden MacBook, destroyed in the basement of the Guardian, is on display at the V&A. I asked some experts for their opinion of this unusual and provocative display of technology.

An alternative 13 best books about science?

What books do you think people should read to understand science – not just its content, but also its history and place in society?

Update: recent(ish) H Word posts

Rather than cross-posting the H Word posts that I seem to have missed adding to this blog, I’m going to give the links here for anyone who might have missed them.

Matthew Flinders bicentenary: statue unveiled to the most famous navigator you’ve probably never heard of (published 18 July 2014), introduced the story of the naval officer and talented surveyor and his circumnavigating cat, Trim. Their statue is now at Euston station, near where Flinders was buried in 1814.

Flinders, who surveyed much of the Australian coast, is better known down under, although even there The big Australian science picnic of 1914 (published 3 September 2014) was a forgotten story. I spoke about it on ABC Radio as well as blogging, drawing on research I did in Australia back in 2007, on the 1914 meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science.

Christopher Wren’s anniversary was recently marked by a well-known search engine, with a drawing of St Paul’s. I took the opportunity to point out that Google Doodle forgot to celebrate Christopher Wren the man of science (published 20 October 2014).